Review of February, 2021 on neilwilby.com

A fairly busy month saw six articles published on this website. They have contributed to a pleasing and continuing upward trend in visitor numbers and page impressions.

The first, published on 10th February, saw a return to the vexed situation in Oldham, where a group of political agitators cling desperately to a series of mostly shocking and desperate untruths, designed almost solely to smear three senior political figures in the town and the party they represent. The article (read in full here) exclusively revealed that Cllr Sean Fielding, the Leader of Oldham Council, had been cleared by Greater Manchester Police of a series of bizarre allegations made by a retired police officer, a tax inspector and a PhD researcher at the University of Manchester.

The offences cited were very serious and included harassment, malicious communication and misfeasance offences; the evidence behind them almost non-existent – and an insider says the police inspector reviewing the case, unsurprisingly, didn’t deem them worthy of investigation.

There were also a series of other exclusive revelations that left agitator-in-chief, Raja Miah, and his core far-right supporters, reeling.

The next three articles, concerning the deaths of two Huddersfield men following contact with the police, were linked. The first tragedy happened in September, 2016 after Andrew Stephen Hall was detained and restrained at the local police station before being taken to the Royal Infirmary, where he died shortly afterwards (read more here).

Less than four months later, Yassar Yaqub was, controversially, shot dead on a slip road at junction 24 of the M62 Trans-Pennine motorway. Just 2km from the Infirmary and less than 4 months after Andrew’s death. The article covered the announcement by the police watchdog that none of the police officers involved in the killing would face misconduct charges (read more here).

Coincidentally (or otherwise), the announcement by the Independent Office for Police Conduct (formerly the IPCC) came on the very same day as the latest pre-inquest hearing touching the death of Mr Hall. The report from that hearing (read in full here) revealed, exclusively, that arguments over police witness anonymity are set to reach the Supreme Court.

On Friday 26th February, 2021, a police watchdog made its latest in a lengthening series of shocking revelations as to the failings of forces in England and Wales. The report by Her Majesty’s Inspector of Constabulary finds, emphatically, that racism, either conscious or unconscious, around stop and search remains unaddressed. My informed take on it can be read here.

The month’s publishing ended on a lighter note with the news that the popular policing drama, Line of Duty, is set to return to TV screens soon (read here). A programme that always resonates strongly with me as I spend a considerable portion of my time either dealing with or reviewing the work of the Professional Standards departments (or branches or directorates) of five police forces.

Two other older pieces are worthy of mention. Both recorded high viewing figures last month: ‘Blind in One Eye’ (read here) challenges the sub-optimal reporting by iconic satirical magazine, Private Eye, of the innocence claim of convicted murderer, Robin Garbutt. ‘Dr Truthseeker loses her moral compass’ owes its renewed interest almost entirely to the recent airing of a Channel 5 documentary featuring Dr Sandra Lean as a criminology ‘expert’. She is, or was, ‘Dr Truthseeker’ (read more here).

Page last updated on Thursday 4th March, 2021 at 1045hrs

Corrections: Please let me know if there is a mistake in this article. I will endeavour to correct it as soon as possible.

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Picture credit: De Montfort University

© Neil Wilby 2015-2021. Unauthorised use, or reproduction, of the material contained in this article, without permission from the author, is strictly prohibited. Extracts from, and links to, the article (or blog) may be used, provided that credit is given to Neil Wilby, with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Watchdog clears police over M62 shooting

An investigation by the police watchdog into the shooting of a 28 year old Huddersfield man, after a hard stop on the M62 slip road at Ainley Top in January, 2017, has decided that no West Yorkshire Police officer committed a criminal offence or breached professional standards (writes Neil Wilby). 

Yassar Yaqub was a passenger in an Audi saloon car. It was returning to the Huddersfield area from a meeting at Cafe de Akbar in Bradford. His family believe he was ‘set up’ by a notorious police informant whom he had met shortly before he was killed.

At Leeds Crown Court, during the trial of the driver of the Audi car, Moshin Amin, it was heard that a microphone had been concealed in the ceiling at the restaurant, by police, who then followed the car through the city and out onto the motorway network. Amin hotly disputed that a hand gun was in the vehicle but the jury found him guilty of conspiring to possess a firearm with intent to endanger life. 

He also says no warning was given before three shots were fired into the Audi by a police marksman (codename Victor 39) from the passenger seat of an unmarked Mercedes Benz car. Amin’s testimony was, also, that Yasser was unarmed and on his mobile phone to a man who owed him money over the sale of a car when he was shot. The trial judge, Mr Justice Turner, during sentencing said that the evidence about the dispute being over a car, rather than drugs, was ‘implausible’.

The Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) said yesterday that its final report into the incident will not be published until after an inquest which is scheduled for January 2022.

Steve Noonan, the IOPC’s Director of Major Investigations, said: “Our investigation into the death of Yassar Yaqub concluded in 2019.

“Our detailed final report has been shared with West Yorkshire Police and the office of Her Majesty’s Coroner. 

“The outcome of our investigation has been shared with Mr Yaqub’s family and interested parties, while recommendations for learning have also been published on our website.

“A copy of our final report has recently been shared with Mr Yaqub’s family and interested parties.

“Our investigation was comprehensive and detailed.

“Police were treated as witnesses throughout the investigation and the report did not indicate that any officer may have committed a criminal offence or behaved in a manner that would justify the bringing of disciplinary proceedings.

“Due to the investigation’s complexity, as well as a parallel criminal investigation and subsequent trial in late 2018 which restricted our access to a number of key witnesses, there was an inevitable impact on when we could finalise our investigation. We recognise that this will have affected Mr Yaqub’s family.

“It would not be appropriate for the IOPC to publish a report or provide further information until the inquest is concluded.

“As always, our thoughts remain with all those affected by Mr Yaqub’s death.”

The investigation was led by one of its former Commissioners, Derrick Campbell, about whom the Yaqub family and their legal team are fiercely critical.

Michael Mansfield QC, the barrister acting for Yaqub’s family, is understood to have told IPCC investigators at a meeting in April 2017 that their approach was reminiscent of “the bad old days” when families were treated with “utter contempt by the police and those charged with investigating police misconduct”.

“The IPCC panel was not fit for purpose – that’s what they’ve shown,” said Mohammed Yaqub. “They tried to tell me certain things that were incorrect. They didn’t have their files with them [at the meeting]. I was very, very, very shocked.”

The disgraced watchdog was forced to change its name to the IOPC a year to the day after Yassar was shot. The IPCC brand had become too toxic after a lengthy catalogue of high profile failures almost from the day of its inception in April, 2004. It replaced the equally troubled Police Complaints Authority.

Mr Yaqub, a successful and well known local businessman, who is adamant that his son was shot unlawfully, has been approached for further comment. Mr Yaqub is a prominent member of the United Friends and Family Campaign (UFFC) which is a coalition of those affected by deaths in police, prison and psychiatric custody, supports others in similar situations. Their present number totals around 1,700.

The press office at West Yorkshire Police has also been asked for a statement. It is understood that the force has applied for anonymity for its officers at the forthcoming inquest. Important case law on the controversial topic, particularly in relation to the death following police custody of another Huddersfield man, Andrew Stephen Hall, is covered in great detail elsewhere on this website (read more here).

Page last updated: Saturday 20th February, 2020 at 0805 hours

Corrections: Please let me know if there is a mistake in this article. I will endeavour to correct it as soon as possible.

Right of reply: If you are mentioned in this article and disagree with it, please let me have your comments. Provided your response is not defamatory it will be added to the article.

Picture Credit: Christopher Furlong/Getty

This article contains public sector information licensed under Open Government Licence v3.0 (read more here).

© Neil Wilby 2015-2021. Unauthorised use, or reproduction, of the material contained in this article, without permission from the author, is strictly prohibited. Extracts from, and links to, the article (or blog) may be used, provided that credit is given to Neil Wilby Media, with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.